Details For Cover ID# 24340

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Cover Type: USA outbound with stamp(s)
Entered by: dwsnow
Added on:Sep 17, 16
Edited on:Sep 17, 16
 
Postmark: Feb 13, 1900
Origin: New York, New York, UNITED STATES
Destination: Hamburg Am Main, GERMANY
 
Description:

1886 10c brown on oriental buff postal entire (#U191) and 1898 5c dark blue (#281) tied by "New York Feb 13, 9:30 PM 1900" duplex postmark, to Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Frankfurt backstamp. This is a triple UPU rate: 5 cents x 3 = 15 cents.

The German addressee is "Metallgellschaf" (Metal Company). The sender, the Lewisohn Brothers in New York, were prominent in the metal business, buying and selling silver, copper, tin, lead and spelter (zinc alloys). The company was very active in the copper mining industry.

Leonard Lewisohn (1847-1902) and his brother Julius were born in Hamburg, Germany. The two brothers immigrated to the U.S. in 1863 as representatives of the mercantile business that their prominent merchant father Samuel Lewisohn had established in Hamburg. Three years later their younger brother Adolph (1849-1938) joined them in New York. They formed the firm of Lewisohn Brothers in January 1866. As early as 1868, the firm turned its attention to the metal trade, becoming prominent dealers in lead during that year.
 
After meeting with Thomas Edison in the 1870s, Adolph Lewisohn pushed the family firm to become involved with copper. Previously undervalued, copper's conductivity made it vital for a world that increasingly depended on electricity. In the 1880s, the brothers were among the first to invest in the copper mines of Butte, Montana - it proved very profitable for them. Their offices were located at 81 and 83 Fulton Street in New York City. Their company was taken over by the United Metals Selling Company in 1900.

Sources: Engineering and Mining Journal, Vol. 69, March 17, 1900. Wikipedia articles on Leonard and Adolph Lewisohn.

Owner's ID: 1194
 
Certificate? No
For Sale? No
Stampless? No
Stamps: