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Posted Sep 20, 20 8:10 by Richard Matta (rkmatta)

Printed matter

Forwarded

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Posted Sep 20, 20 8:00 by Richard Matta (rkmatta)

Printed matter

An odd one - it is a printed matter rate without return address - apparent "top of stack" use, and since it was marked due it likely was not accepted as printed matter.

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Posted Sep 20, 20 7:31 by Richard Matta (rkmatta)

Printed matter

A bit later

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Posted Sep 19, 20 21:41 by Rob Faux (robfaux)

Kingdom of Italy/Sardinia

And one more with Sardinian issues.

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Posted Sep 19, 20 21:38 by Rob Faux (robfaux)

Papiers d'affairs

Internal French mail.
Just to mix things up a bit more and support Roger's entry of Swiss material.
Rob

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Posted Sep 19, 20 21:20 by Mike Ellingson (mikeellingson)

printed matter

One of the more attractive postmarks to be found on a printed matter rate cover, from a pneumatic machine.

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Posted Sep 19, 20 16:39 by Roger Heath (decoppet)

Swiss engagement announcement Winterthur to Frankfort, KY

May 2, 1881

To Mr Joseph Desha Pickett, Kentucky Superintendent of Public Education, Frankfort. An engagement announcement.

5 centimes = 1 cent.

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Posted Sep 19, 20 16:27 by Roger Heath (decoppet)

Printed Matter from Switzerland

March 13, 1881 from Cham to Lynn City, MA.

Handmade printed matter wrapper sent by the A.S.C. Milk Co.
Charles Page founded in 1866 the Anglo-Swiss Condensed Milk Company in Cham, Switzerland. The invention of making milk safe to can, and the construction of a factory to produce this product allowed the dairy farmers of the Cham region to have an ongoing buyer for their milk which was beneficial to all in the area.

This later became the Nestle Company.
http://www.nestle.com/aboutus/history/nestle-company-history/page-brothers-anglo-swiss

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Posted Sep 19, 20 14:38 by Ken Lawrence (kenlawrence)

Gérard Gilbert

is on the list here

Added: This is the only Gilbert mark I could find, from when he was Heinrich Koehler's partner.

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Posted Sep 19, 20 14:18 by Gordon Eubanks (gordon)

Printed Matter

With all the interesting in Printed Matter I might recommend Ron Cipolla's CofC winning exhibit on the USPCS website:

https://www.uspcs.org/resource-center/philatelic-exhibits/miscellaneous-exhibits/how-the-post-facilitated-distribution-of-the-printed-word-1775-1870/

Also on the PhilaMercury site on the exhibits page.

Posted Sep 19, 20 13:53 by Trish Kaufmann (delabelle)

Owner's Mark

Regarding the GILBERT owner's mark on the Confederate cover in the last Siegel sale, lot 112, I do not believe this is Dan Gilbert's. I knew Dan quite well and never knew him to mark his covers. Secondly, it is marked on the front of the cover near the stamps and that is typical of old time European owner markings. Few collectors mark anything on the front anymore and Americans very seldom. I, too, would like to determine proper attribution.

Posted Sep 19, 20 13:00 by Rob Faux (robfaux)

Unsealed circular to Switzerland

Hope everyone is doing well.
Rob

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Posted Sep 19, 20 12:58 by Rob Faux (robfaux)

Harrow printed matter

part of the content from post below

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Posted Sep 19, 20 12:57 by Rob Faux (robfaux)

Harrow printed matter

This one came with great content as well.  I'll show some of it with next post.

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Posted Sep 19, 20 12:55 by Rob Faux (robfaux)

Circular

I am enjoying seeing all of the interesting things being shared.  Keep it up!
Rob

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Posted Sep 19, 20 10:15 by Richard Matta (rkmatta)

1877 circular

Wrapper with enclosure

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Posted Sep 19, 20 10:01 by Richard Matta (rkmatta)

Newspaper

One incoming

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Posted Sep 19, 20 9:58 by Richard Matta (rkmatta)

Newspaper

One that Ron Cipolla will recognize

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Posted Sep 18, 20 20:38 by Gregory Shoults (coilcollector)

Printed Matter ???

Interesting item

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Posted Sep 18, 20 20:34 by Gregory Shoults (coilcollector)

Printed Matter Foreign Destination

One of two reported horizontal imperforate coils.

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Posted Sep 18, 20 20:33 by Gregory Shoults (coilcollector)

Printed Matter

Printed matter triple rate

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Posted Sep 18, 20 20:31 by Gregory Shoults (coilcollector)

Printed Matter

Traveling just across the street, 14 times the printed matter rate

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Posted Sep 18, 20 19:56 by Roland Cipolla (roncipolla)

Many Old Friends of Printed Matter

The posts of the last few days showing many nice printed matter items, for me, was a trip down memory lane. 15 different items shown were at one-time mine - either the 1ct 1851 exhibit or the more recently my printed matter exhibit from 11 years ago. It is nice to see them and that so many fine collectors are enjoying them.

Yet not everything has yet to be discovered... there still are still new-finds of merit.

The item below was found last month on eBay properly described as "Paid circular dated July 31, 1851, to New York from San Francisco printed circular with 4 pages." Fortunately for me, what was not so obvious, or noted, was the partial strike of the numeral '5' off the top edge of the cover in conjunction with a matching 'PAID. Also, the sender is the firm "Hussey Bond & Hale".

This becomes only the 6th or 7th recorded example of the rare and desirable 5 cents over 3500-mile circular rate in effect 1 July 1851 thru 30 September 1852.

Two examples have stamps (see Eubank's post below) and four, now five are stampless.

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Posted Sep 18, 20 19:28 by David Snow (dwsnow)

Printed Circulars

I enjoyed the show-and-tell of the printed circulars. Thanks to all who participated.

I am just now taking in all the great examples posted by Rich Drews on 1861 era circulars.

I was reading the 1856 St. Louis circular in Cover ID 22102 and noticed in the upper left corner a clear embossed cameo design of a side paddlewheel steamer, under which are the initials U. & S., presumably the paper manufacturer. The 600 dpi scan that I am showing here does not do justice to it; holding it at an angle under a good light it is much clearer.

I have other examples of different clear embossed cameo designs on letter sheets from 1840s to 1860s - I find them fascinating.

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Posted Sep 18, 20 19:11 by Richard Drews (bear427)

newspapers

to France and Netherlands

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Posted Sep 18, 20 19:06 by Richard Drews (bear427)

1861 era circular and newspaper

to Mexico and Italy

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Posted Sep 18, 20 18:51 by Richard Drews (bear427)

1861 era circular

to Nova Scotia

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Posted Sep 18, 20 18:48 by Richard Drews (bear427)

short paid circular

2 cent "Z" grill to Bremen

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Posted Sep 18, 20 18:43 by Richard Drews (bear427)

book post to GB

voluminous legal papers treated as books

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Posted Sep 18, 20 18:33 by Richard Drews (bear427)

1861 era circular

to Bremen via Hamburg, 1 cent extra

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Posted Sep 18, 20 18:29 by Richard Drews (bear427)

seed packet and top piece of multiple circulars

both domestic

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Posted Sep 18, 20 18:26 by Richard Drews (bear427)

clearly a newspaper rate

domestic

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Posted Sep 18, 20 18:25 by Richard Drews (bear427)

1861 era circular

Thurn and Taxis to Bremen

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Posted Sep 18, 20 18:22 by Richard Drews (bear427)

1861 era circular

via Hamburg to Norway

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Posted Sep 18, 20 18:20 by Richard Drews (bear427)

1861 era circular

contents enclosed

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Posted Sep 18, 20 16:37 by Scott Steward (steward1815)

Not A Circular Rate

A second example of a circular from 1860 addressed to a PM paying the circular rate.

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Posted Sep 18, 20 13:28 by Scott Steward (steward1815)

Not A Circular Rate

Richard,

I could be wrong, but I do not believe it is true this cover could have gone postage free. The cover was mailed in 1859 and the 1857 PL&R Section 192 states " It is the practice of many to address, their hand bills and newspapers in the nature of circulars or hand bills to postmasters, by which means they give them an extensive circulation free of postage. This is an abuse which must be corrected. In every instance where a postmaster receives a communication, addressed to him as postmaster, which is of a private character, and designed to promote private interests, with an evident intention of giving circulation to it, without paying postage, he will return the same to the person who sent it, under a new envelope, with the charge of letter postage indorsed." The envelope contains a circular recruiting Postmasters to serve as agents selling their books.

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Posted Sep 18, 20 12:12 by Steve Walske (steve w)

Garibaldi

Just after capturing Rome, ardent republican Garibaldi offered his services to the new French Republican Government (formed September 4 after the collapse of the 3rd Empire), which offered him command of the Armee des Vosges. General Garibaldi arrived in the provincial capital at Tours on October 9, 1870 and left for Dole on October 14 to begin assembling his army.

The letter below was addressed to him at Tours from besieged Paris on October 25. Full of enthusiasm over Garibaldi's importance to the war effort, the letter arrived at Tours on November 2, after flying out of Paris on the balloon "Vauban." It was forwarded to Garibaldi at Dole.

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Posted Sep 18, 20 11:49 by David D'Alessandris (davidd)

Siege of Paris / Unification of Italy

Due to the Franco-Prussian War, the French recalled their troops from the Papal States where they were protecting the Papacy against Garabladi's troops in the reunification of Italy.  Sunday (September 20) will mark the 150th anniversary of the fall of Rome when Garabaldi's troops breached the Roman walls at Porta Pia.  Sorry, I don't own one of the Rome covers dated 20 September 1870 (they exist).  Best I can do is Frosinone a month earlier (August 27, 1870).  A series of popes remained in the Vatican from that date until the Lateran Treaty in 1929. 

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Posted Sep 18, 20 10:17 by Steve Walske (steve w)

Siege of Paris

In honor of the Siege of Paris that began 150 years ago today, I post the postcard below. The postal siege began just after 5pm on September 18, 1870, when the last two postal trains left for the west. Mail processed in Paris after the 4th collection period was trapped in the siege.

This post-free fieldpost card was supplied to German soldiers to facilitate their communications home. In this case, it was given to a French artillery captain who had been captured in an August 31 battle around Metz and who datelined this card near Metz on September 11. His captors, the 7th Army Corps, added their private cachet as a censor marking and postmarked it "K.PR. Feld-Post-Amt. 7. Armee-Cps" on September 13. It was routed via Prussia to Paris, where the blue September 18 "Prusse Erquelines" entry postmark was applied, and the POW free frank was endorsed by a blue "P.D." Trapped by the siege, this card was taken by the first postal linecrosser, Simon Létoile, across the German lines on September 20 to Evreux. It was sent from there to its destination in Brittany on September 23.

This simple card captures much of the essence of that war, which was so disastrous for the French.

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Posted Sep 18, 20 9:36 by Richard Frajola (frajola)

Not A Circular Rate

Catching up a little on old posts. The cover below, with printed address "To The Postmaster" did not require any postage and was entitled to go free.

In fact, I would have to wonder if the stamp originated  ....

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Posted Sep 18, 20 7:07 by Mark Schwartz (schwamoo)

Westtown - Bill Schultz

The terrific display of Westtown locals Bill curated was at the Chester County Historical Society. He pulled it together from their archives. One specific collector, whose name escapes me, put an exhibit of them together several decades ago and won whatever show he had entered. Bill also curated a very large showing of great early U.S. material for a display there that lasted several months and entertained many hundreds (maybe more) of folks who visited.

Posted Sep 18, 20 6:15 by Tim O'Connor (drtimo)

West Town

Rob, nice modern postal history. Bill Schultz put together a glorious showing of West Town local mail. I'm wondering if it's related to your piece, and hope that he saved (?digitized) the exhibit. Tim

Posted Sep 17, 20 22:08 by Ray Porter (rporter314)

Late Ship

Back

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Posted Sep 17, 20 22:07 by Ray Porter (rporter314)

Late Ship

Typically would not be interested in BEP dues, but do pick up what appears to be interesting.

Front

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Posted Sep 17, 20 19:13 by Rob Faux (robfaux)

West Town

Here is a use of a West Town local to a foreign destination. 

I have not seen another West Town as a drop letter example, nor have I seen another to an overseas destination.  Anyone?

Rob

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Posted Sep 17, 20 16:20 by Chip Gliedman (cgliedman)

A few more circulars/periodicals

Some strange rates - 3/4c and 1 1/4c for half sheet periodicals (as per Act of 1827).

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Posted Sep 17, 20 16:16 by Rick Kunz (segesvar)

Sesma

Thanks, KL for the references about Sesma. It does not appear that it ever had a Post Office, but the lumber references relate to the letter contents where the husband tells his wife that he wants to stay there if the mill continues to operate through the winter. I sense a little marital discord because she wants to move to San Francisco and he grudgingly assents.

Posted Sep 17, 20 13:59 by Gerald Nylander (gn19091914)

Letters on the side

Siderographers placed their initials on the LL side margin.  Plate finishers put their initials in the LR margin.  On a few plates they placed their initials in the bottom margin of the plate. 

Posted Sep 17, 20 12:38 by Terry Kurzinski (terryk)

Letters on the side of a sheet for 611 inperf

How do I know if this is the printers initials or sideographers? Any help would be appreciated.

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