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Posted Nov 26, 14 16:32 by Richard Martorelli (richard d)

bisected US postage dues

Good day to all. I am working on an article on US postage due bisects. I have Dr. Charles' work on the Jefferson, Iowa bisects in 1895, and Mr. Irwin's" Postal History of the United States Large Numeral Postage Dues".

I have two items. One is a commercial 1918 envelope with a two cent postage due stamp bisected to collect 1 cent due on a short-paid WWI rate. The second is an October 1925 third class permit envelope return postage guaranteed with a one cent postage due stamp and a bisected one-cent postage due stamp to collect 1 and 1/2 cents due. After getting the required approvals, i will upload the images. Thank you

Posted Nov 26, 14 15:00 by Ken Lawrence (kenlawrence)

Black Honduras

Thanks, Rich. I will ask him.

Thanks, Leonard. Yes, I have the Green booklet. He was an assiduous researcher, and a credulous reporter, so he got several things wrong, but the chief limitation today is that so much of the drama came later than 1961. 

Yet, if the stamp had retained its value it would be worth more than a million dollars now. It sold for more money when two were known in 1994 than the 2012 realization as a unique stamp.

Posted Nov 26, 14 13:42 by Leonard Hartmann (hartmann)

Black Honduras

I assume you are familiar with the CCNY booklet, etc. which we have in stock

The Black Honduras by Irving I. Green,1962, 32 pages, card, stamp, history and philately $9.50

Leonard

Posted Nov 26, 14 13:08 by Ed Field (ecf2000)

CDS cancels

Here is a Baltimore CDS cancel on a cover to Holland

Image

Posted Nov 26, 14 12:11 by Richard Drews (bear427)

Black Honduras

Ken,

About 20 years ago a client of mine was collecting the Honduras airmails. I managed, with the assistance of Keith Harmer, to get him every item including vaieties except for the black. Keith did locate where they both were at the time. My client wavered and never came up with th funds for the black. Keith may have some info to share.

Rich

Posted Nov 26, 14 11:55 by Ken Lawrence (kenlawrence)

Black Honduras question

The 1925 blue 10-centavos Ulua Bridge stamp of Honduras surcharged AERO CORREO 25 in black ink [making it into a 25-centavos air mail stamp], Honduras Scott C12, is better known as the “Black Honduras” referring to the ink color of the overprint. Today it is recognized as the world’s rarest air mail stamp.

At one time four of the stamp were known to exist. The Membreno pair was lost in 1927, leaving two. The Ustariz single was last seen at the January 23-24 2002 Cherrystone sale. When the Robinette single, now believed to be unique, was sold [to Mystic Stamp Company] in Cherrystone's January 11 2012 "Santa Fe" sale, the description stated that "the Ustariz example was lost by its buyer (left accidentally either in a New York City taxi or a restaurant) and never recovered."

I have searched in vain for a contemporaneous report of that loss. Can someone here direct me to a published record of it? I can't imagine a loss of such a great philatelic rarity being unreported until a decade later, but thus far I've been stymied.

Posted Nov 26, 14 10:30 by Gordon Eubanks (gordon)

Here is one from the 1851-1856 period. A much higher percentage of my covers during this period have stamps killed with the town postmark.

This cover, from Chicago to Sardinia traveled by American Packet Atlantic. The stamps pay the 21 cent British Open Mail rate.

Image

Posted Nov 26, 14 10:18 by Gordon Eubanks (gordon)

Here is another postmark killing a pair of 1847 10 cent stamps.

Image

Posted Nov 26, 14 10:17 by Gordon Eubanks (gordon)

Postmarks canceling stamps

Here is an example East Bennington VT. In July 1849 East Bennington became 2nd postoffice in Benningotn and the 'East' was dropped from the name.

Image

Posted Nov 26, 14 9:42 by Russ Ryle (hoosierboy)

re: PMG reports

Morning Jim and all,

Been away from the hobby the last two weeks or so.  Just now trying to catch up.  Hopefuly, one or more libraries or organizations has already expressed an interest in your material.  In any case ... 

If you would send me a copy of your archive of PMG reports I would be happy to take on the task of supplying duplicate copies on request to those interested especially if they would be kind enough to send along postage costs and a few pennies for the mailer.

Yes, Jim, this material is available in bits and pieces at other locations.  However, sounds like your efforts have produced an archive worthy of preservation and distribution.

I should be able to label each item for its true year covered.

Not sure your images can be easily converted into key word searchable files; but, will look into this once I see their format. 

Best regards,

Russ Ryle
POB 2466
Bloomington, IN 47402



Posted Nov 26, 14 8:56 by Bob Bramwell (rudy2donline)

Instant Compliance

Thanks for digging up the notice.  Schenectady under PM Luke Dodge, whose background prior to appointment in 1853 was "liveryman" - keeping a large stable next to the main residential area of the town so that people could avoid the burden of keeping their horses and carriages in their back yards,  must have complied with the instruction immediately.
This August 8 1860 is my first cover after the order could have reached Schenectady on the 24th.  The idea was so new that Dodge's clerk took great care with the strikes for the first month or two.
Bob

Image

Posted Nov 26, 14 4:28 by David Snow (dwsnow)

More postmarks on stamps

Just for fun, here are a few more postmarks on stamps and indicia of postal entires from the 1860s.

Plus one 1c blue on manila star die wrapper with the Georgetown, D.C. Jan. 29 cds at right.

Image

Posted Nov 26, 14 3:51 by David Snow (dwsnow)

postmarks on stamps 1860s continued

Here are more examples of circular datestamps used as cancels on stamps from 1860s, contrary to postal regulations. 

Note uses from large cities: Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Louisville, and New Orleans. 
In addition to small towns and Long Island R.R. route agent marking.

Image

Posted Nov 26, 14 3:00 by David Snow (dwsnow)

Circular datestamps used as cancels 1860s

Postmaster General Joseph Holt's regulation against using dated postmarks as cancels on stamps was cheerfully ignored by post offices throughout the land, as these examples attest.

I think PMG Holt and his immediate successors Horatio King and Montgomery Blair had more important priorities to be concerned about rather than enforcing that regulation. Such as the disruptions caused by the Civil War.

Image

Posted Nov 25, 14 21:02 by Gordon Eubanks (gordon)

Postmarks and killers

The regulations during the 1847 period into the 1851 period gave specific instructions on how to kill a stamp and also required the postmark. This of course was widely ignored during the period.

Posted Nov 25, 14 20:23 by David Snow (dwsnow)

Prohibition of Cancelling a Stamp with Postmark

Bob Bramwell: 

Postmaster General Joseph Holt, on July 23, 1860, issued a ban against cancelling stamps with a town-marking stamp, effective that date.

This new requirement for applying a separate killer to the stamp resulted in almost doubling the cancelling workload. It led to the use of the Norton patent duplex cancelling device at the New York City post office.

Source: "The United States 1c Franklin 1861-1867, and an Introduction to the Postal History of the Period" by Don L. Evans. Here is scan of pertinent page from the book.

Image

Posted Nov 25, 14 20:17 by Mike Ellingson (mikeellingson)

Prohibit Canceling a Stamp with Postmark

Bob,
Found a reference that mentions a supplementary regulation (Jul 23,1860) which states "Postmasters are prohibited from using the marking or rating stamps to cancel the postage stamps, it being found imperfect; and a distinct canceller must be used."

The Philatelic Foundation Seminar Series, Textbook No. 3, "US Postmarks and Cancellations", edited by Scott Trepel / Harlan Stone

Posted Nov 25, 14 19:21 by Bob Bramwell (rudy2donline)

Prohibit Canceling a Stamp with Postmark

Does anyone know offhand when and how the subject was communicated (law or instruction)?  I have the Post-Office Assistant which begins October 1860 and I need a clue how deep in I need to look.

Thanks,
Bob

Posted Nov 25, 14 14:45 by Scott Trepel (strepel)

Stanley Gibbons

Gordon Nowell-Usticke

I learned about Gordon Usticke from Raymond Weill and Bob Siegel, and I doubt many of today's collectors and dealers know his name or reputation.

He ran "Stanley Gibbons Inc.", the New York firm with the name of the British concern that exists today.

Ustike was a true scholar and philatelist. He found many of the 2c Harding Rotary Perf 11 stamps in existence today (Scott 613) by going through thousands and thousands of copies in his stock.

Siegel and Weill bought the Usticke/SG stock, including his renowned collection of Rembrandt etchings. You can find the sale catalog on Amazon:  THE DISTINGUISHED COLLECTION OF REMBRANDT ETCHINGS-- FORMED BY GORDON W. NOWELL-USTICKE.

Siegel lamented their decision to sell the Rembrandt collection for something like $75,000 to $100,000. Today it would be worth countless millions.

As for the stamps, when I handled the Weill stock there were still stockbooks filled with stamps arranged by Usticke.

Posted Nov 25, 14 11:03 by Lawrence Gregg (ecovers)

Stamp Dealer

Possibly an interesting item for those who collect stamp dealer related stuff.

Stanley Gibbons

Posted Nov 25, 14 10:48 by Ginny Nightingale (ginnyflo)

Help ~~ NY Cancel

Thank you, Leonard.

Posted Nov 23, 14 23:51 by John Shepherd (tas philatelist)

Chicagopex 2014

Congrats to Aussie Ken Scudder on his award. 

Queensland is a bit of an unloved colony, his book really fills a gap in the literature.


*********************************************************

Queensland Postage Stamps, 1879-1912

By Kenneth F. Scudder, FRPSV

A comprehensive study of all Queensland surface-printed issues from 1879 to 1912, including the 1881 Chalon Head Lithgraphed high values, and the 1882 Bradbury Wilkinson Chalon Heads, as well as the duty adhesives of the same period.

These neglected issues are full of much philatelic interest, with all the designs from 1882 onwards being derived from a single 2d steel die engraved by Bradbury Wilkinson. The author traces the techniques used to develop these designs from the original 1882 Shaded Background type, through issues with a White Background, the ’2-Numeral’ and 4-Numeral’ issues. All stamps are dealt with comprehensively, with full details of the ‘Types’ used to make-up the printing plates (all illustrated), the printings made, exhaustive lists of plate flaws, and the essays and proofs. There is also a new look at the famous ’2-Numeral’ 6d Green.

There are chapters dealing with the 1899 ‘Small’ ½d, the 1900 Charity issue, and the 1903 Commonwealth design, as well as Papers and Perforations, and the Specimen overprints.

The result of many years’ work, this new volume is one of the most important new books on Australian Colonial stamps for many years.

400 A4 pages with over 100 in colour.

Image

Posted Nov 23, 14 16:44 by Thomas Mazza (tom mazza)

Robert H. Morris advertised the new 3 cent rate for circulars March 15, 1847.

tcm

Posted Nov 23, 14 15:57 by Roland Cipolla (roncipolla)

3 Cent Circular Rate

Bob,


The 3 March 1847 postal law, the one that established the first two US postage stamps, Sec. 13 part the way in not only raised circulars but also newspapers.  The increase was strongly oppose by business that sent a lot of printed matter.

The strange thing about this change is Congress specified no implmentation date.  Generally, based on some New York circulars it changed from 2ct to 3ct around 22 March 1847 or so.

Posted Nov 23, 14 14:55 by Leonard Piszkiewicz (lenp99)

Help -- N.Y. cancel

New York Transfer Clerk Railway Mail Service Grand Central Sta. -- MPOS type 150-I-11

Posted Nov 23, 14 14:49 by Bob Bramwell (rudy2donline)

1848 Circular Rate

The cover is a circular rated Paid 3, dated Sep 19 1848.  I cannot find anything after the 1845 postal law that raised the rate on circulars from 2c to 3 and required prepayment.  What am I missing?

Bob

Image

Posted Nov 23, 14 14:39 by Ginny Nightingale (ginnyflo)

Help

Can anyone tell me what the letters at the bottom of the cancel stand for? Thanks! ~ Ginny

Image

Posted Nov 23, 14 14:04 by Ray Porter (rporter314)

Stars

Thanks Richard ..., I must be going blind as I thought that was a smudge. Both 2 cent greens have a single SON star cancel and so now I know. The clerk in Petersborough obliterated the US stamps so they could not be reused.

On a technical note, the US stamps were not really used in mailing the letter. This appears to be similar to CTO's i.e. not postally used but not usable as postage. Was the clerk on firm legal ground to "kill" the US stamps?

Posted Nov 23, 14 11:53 by Richard Frajola (frajola)

Star Cancels?

Ray P - The only "star" cancel I see on your cover is the Peterborough rubber duplex datestamp with star killer that hits only one of the postage dues stamps. The other dues all have manuscrpts cancels. Not sure where your cover started life but likely came into New Yoprk City from a contract mail carrying steamer arriving from a UPU member country. A non contract steamer would have been rated as a ship rate due.

Posted Nov 23, 14 11:49 by Richard Frajola (frajola)

PCM Rates

Rick - The PCM rate was 28 cents if PREPAID and 30c if not ... the rate schedules were not always very clear on this point.

Posted Nov 23, 14 11:35 by Rick Mingee (ramingee)

PCM Rate Question - California to Germany (Wurttemberg)

When did the PCM rate change from 30 cents to 28 cents (via NY, British Mails)? I have seen a lot of covers overpaying the 28 cent rate with 30 cents in stamps, but I found a cover in 1864 with a handstamp (unpaid) double 30 rate (60 handstamp) that i thought was after the rate change. I would assume they would not mark the rate wrong in this case, but it could be a mistake. Or it's still in the 30 rate period and I am wrong on dates.

Posted Nov 23, 14 11:30 by Chip Gliedman (cgliedman)

Map

The map inside (each floor tile behind the map is 12" a side, so just over 2x3 feet)

Image

Posted Nov 23, 14 11:30 by Chip Gliedman (cgliedman)

Big Covers

I don't know what possessed me to get this, but it's probably the largest mailed item in my collection.

2x3 foot map of Vermont Central Railroad sent from Liverpool to London, then forwarded on to Glasgow. 8d postage for 4oz for both the original and forwarded mail fees.

Just came across it again when arranging some stuff on my bookshelf and thought I'd share.

Chip

Image

Posted Nov 23, 14 8:42 by Richard Drews (bear427)

chicagopex literature palmares

CHICAGOPEX 2014 Literature Palmares
November 22, 2014
Grand
Kenneth F. Scudder, FRPSV
Queensland Postage Stamps 1879 to 1912
Reserve Grand
David Wrisley The State Revenue Catalog
LITERATURE EXHIBITS
Gold
David Wrisley The State Revenue Catalog
Valery B. Zagorsky Postage Stamp Catalogue: Russia 1857-1917, RSFSR 1918-1922, USSR 1923-1991
James W. Graue German North Atlantic Catapult Airmail Flights 1929-1935, Second Edition
Irwin J. Gibbs Canal Zone Postal Stationery
American Air Mail Catalogue, 7th Ed.,Vol. 1
Jay Grace Walmsley The Travelling Post Offices of Mexico, Second Edition
Harry K. Charles, Jr. Postage Due: The United States Postage Due Essays, Proofs and
Specimens 1879-1986
Gary W. Granzow, FRPSL
Line Engraved Security Printing
Kenneth Trettin The Congress Book 2014
Kenneth F. Scudder, FRPSV
Queensland Postage Stamps 1879 to 1912
Robert V. Ogrodnik Bulletin of the Polonus Philatelic Society
Jonas Hällström Fakes Forgeries Experts No. 17, 2014
Diane DeBlois andRobert Dalton Harris Postal History Journal
Wayne Youngblood,Editor The Posthorn
Peter Martin, Editor First Days
Michael D. Roberts Mexicana
James W. Graue The German Postal Specialist
Vickie Canfield Peters Airpost Journal
Michael Mahler The American Revenuer, 2013
Vermeil
Robert Littrell The Postal Stationery of the Cuban Republic
Ingert Kuzych Lemberg: Cosmopolitan Crownland Capital of the Austrian Empire
Douglas N. Clark,Editor From Indian Trails to the Birth of a Nation
John C. Roberts Ukrainian Philatelist
Jack R. Congrove, Editor Biophilately: Official Journal of the Biology Unit of ATA
Dr. Giorgio Migliavacca Fil-Italia
Richard D. Bates, Jr. The Canal Zone Philatelist
Richard D. Jones USCS Log
Ulf J. Lindahl Menelik's Journal
Wayne Youngblood Topical Time
Claire Scott, FRPSL Postal History
Claire Scott, FRPSL The Sarawak Journal
Silver
Norman Gruenzner Combat and Special Operations of US Motor Torpedo Boats During WWII
George McGowan Newfoundland Slogan Cancels
Charles J. LaBlonde Swissair Special Flights of 20 September 1944
Robert P. Odenweller The Chalon Sorting Guide: Supplement to the postage stamps of New Zealand: 1855-1873
Jack R. Congrove The Mother of all Indexes: Biophilately Vol 1-62 with unit history
Kendall Sanford "La Catastrophe": Journal of the Wreck & Crash Mail Society
PSGSA Forerunners
Ronnie J. MacMillan Methodist Philatelic Society Newsletter
Glenn A. Estus The Vermont Philatelist
Len McMaster, Editor Possessions, Vol. 34 (2013)
Martin Oakes The New Cartophilatelist
Alan Warren Ice Cap News
CHICAGOPEX 2014 Literature Jury Members:
Patrick Walters, Jury Chairman
Stephen Schumann, Judge
Guy Dillaway, Judge

Posted Nov 23, 14 8:38 by Ray Porter (rporter314)

Invalid use of stamps

thanks Leonard, I was looking at this cover from the perspective the Conastatota CDS is a post-mark when it really is a transit-mark.

I am curious about the star cancels. Has anyone seen these cancels used elsewhere? Could they have been applied to prevent reuse?

Ray

Posted Nov 23, 14 8:35 by Richard Drews (bear427)

chicagopex palmares

CHICAGOPEX 2014 Palmares
November 22, 2014
Grand - President's Award
Jerzy Kupiec-Weglinski Air Mail in the Polish Territories (1914-1939)
Reserve Grand - Felix Ganz Award
Robert Puchala Cracow Issue 1919
Single Frame Grand
Richard D. Bates, Jr. How Errors and Varieties Arose on Flat Press U.S. Stamps Overprinted CANAL ZONE
COURT OF HONOR EXHIBITS
Dr. James Mazepa Poland: 1918-1919 First and Second Warsaw Provisional Issues
Jacek Kosmala Aerial Formations of the Gen. Haller "Blue" Army and the French Military Mission in Poland 1917-1923
Dr. James Mazepa The Poland Stamp of the U.S. Overrun Countries Series: 1943
MULTI-FRAME EXHIBITS
Gold
Richard Larkin Booklet Panes and Covers-United States and Possessions 1900-1945
Slawomir Chabros Correspondence of Polish Legions 1914-1917
Dr. Robert B. Pildes Artists' Drawings, Essays and Proofs and Associated Material of the 1948 Do'Ar Ivri Issue of Israel
Marek Zbierski Polish Postal Rates May 1924 - September 1939
George Zelwinder "Groszy" Provisional Issues of Poland 1950-52 and Their Use
Louis Fiset Mail Between USA and France 1939-1945
Gerald Menge General Gouvernement Protectorate Semi-Postal Issues
Alfred F. Kugel Polish Forces in Exile During & Following World War II
Robert Schlesinger The 1938 Presidential Issue-A Survey of Rates
Robert Puchala Cracow Issue 1919
Ryszard Prange Basketball Report - I Love This Game
Kathryn L. Johnson Senegal: French Colonial Africa 1914-1940
Alexander Kolchinsky The Mail of Leningrad Blockade
Tom Brougham Canal Zone Overprints on Panama's 1909 ABNC Portrait Designs
Jerzy Kupiec-Weglinski Air Mail in the Polish Territories (1914-1939)
Kathryn J. Johnson Honduras Traditional Exhibit of the Guardiola and Medina Issues
Michael Ley Burma: The First Two Issues
Ingert Kuzych The Western Ukrainian National Republic, 1918-1919
Roman Sobus Internal Camp Post at Offizierlager IIC - Woldenberg Between 1942-1945
Richard S. Wilson Egypt - Postmarks Found on the Army Post Stamps - 1936-1941
Andrew O. Martyniuk The Overprint and Use in Ukraine of the Two Kopek Russian Coat-of-Arms Stamp
Robert D. Hohertz Revenue Stamped Paper of the Spanish American War Tax Era
Wieslaw Kostka Kingdom of Poland - Study of Rates for Stampless Mail 1815-1871
Jack R. Congrove Alexander Hamilton: Soldier, Financier, Statesman, Founder
Gregory Shoults Washington and Franklin Coils 1908-1924 Flat Plate, Rotary Press and
Coil Waste Issues
James Allen The First United States 12c Stamp 1851-1861
Vermeil
John Hunt Revenue Stamped Paper of the Spanish Administration of the Philippines
1705-1899
Jerzy Bartke Austrian Galicia and Free City of Cracow-The Pre-Adhesive Period
Raimundas Marius Lapas Postal History of Vilnius/Vilna/Wilna/Wilno 1914-1922
Frank Karwoski Poland's 10-Mk. Sower Stamp (1921-3)
Dickson Preston Canal Zone Postal Rates 1928-1958
Milosz Rzadkosz Military Postal Censorship in 1939 in Poland
Richard J. Marek The Cross-Border Postal History of Vermont and Canada
Irwin Gibbs Canal Zone Postal Stationery 1907-1924
Silver
Brad Wilde Canal Zone: First Permanent Airmail Series Used on International Mail
Lisa Foster American Postal Machine Company Chicago, ILL. Main Post Office Letter
Die Flag Cancels
Chester Majewski Polish Personalized Stamps
Brad Wilde Canal du Panama: Mail Pertaining to French Effort
Robert Tatara Poland's Millennium on U.S. and Polish Covers - 1959 to 1967
Silver Bronze
Michael D. Drabik The Canal Zone Golden Anniversary Air Mail Stamps
Glenn J. Staron The Canal Zone Postal Service Second Issue
SINGLE FRAME EXHIBITS
Gold
David Zemer World War I Censorship of Mail in the Canal Zone
David Zemer The 1920 Panama and Canal Zone 50c Stamp from Photograph to Production
Dariusz Grochowski Essays and Proofs of the Post War Lublin Issue
Richard D. Bates, Jr. How Errors and Varieties Arose on Flat Press U.S. Stamps Overprinted CANAL ZONE
Andrew Urushima 1944 Gross Born POW Olympics
Andrzej Klamut Enclave Jasna Gora
Slawomir Chabros Internment Camp's Correspondence of Polish Legionaries 1917-1918
Dickson Preston U.S. Army Post Offices In Greenland 1941-1945
Vermeil
Alfred F. Kugel Panama Canal Zone Registered Mail 1905-1922
Roman Okninski Numeral Cancellation "1" in Warsaw 1858-1875
Marcus Meyerotto Poland Telegraph Receipt Rates 1918-1924
Jerzy Bartke Use of Bisected Stamps on Polish Territories
SPONSORED AWARDS
Polonus Multi-Frame Grand Award
Jerzy Kupiec-Weglinski Air Mail in the Polish Territories (1914-1939)
Polonus Single Frame Grand Award
Dariusz Grochowski Essays and Proofs of the Post War Lublin Issue
Polonus Novice Award
Milosz Rzadkosz Military Postal Censorship in 1939 in Poland
Canal Zone Study Group Multi-Frame Silver Award
Irwin Gibbs Canal Zone Postal Stationery 1907-1924
Canal Zone Study Group Single Frame Silver Medal
Richard D. Bates, Jr. How Errors and Varieties Arose on Flat Press U.S. Stamps Overprinted CANAL ZONE
Canal Zone Study Group-Novice Award
Glenn J. Staron The Canal Zone Postal Service Second Issue
United States Possessions Philatelic Society-Best Multi-Frame
Tom Brougham Canal Zone Overprints on Panama's 1909 ABNC Portrait Designs
United States Possessions Philatelic Society-Best Single Frame
Richard D. Bates, Jr. How Errors and Varieties Arose on Flat Press U.S. Stamps Overprinted CANAL ZONE
Ukranian Philatelic Society-The Golden Trident
Ingert Kuzych The Western Ukrainian National Republic, 1918-1919
American Philatelic Society Research Medal
James Allen The First United States 12c Stamp 1851-1861
American Philatelic Society 1940-1980 Medal of Excellence
Alexander Kolchinsky The Mail of Leningrad Blockade
American Philatelic Society 1900-1940 Medal of Excellence
Kathryn J. Johnson Honduras Traditional Exhibit of the Guardiola and Medina Issues
American Philatelic Society Pre-1900 Medal of Excellence
Wieslaw Kostka Kingdom of Poland - Study of Rates for Stampless Mail 1815-1871
Best Exhibit by A Chicago Philatelic Society Member
Dr. Robert B. Pildes Artists' Drawings, Essays and Proofs and Associated Material of the 1948 Do'Ar Ivri Issue of Israel
Collectors Club of Chicago Award
Gregory Shoults Washington and Franklin Coils 1908-1924 Flat Plate, Rotary Press and
Coil Waste Issues
Women Exhibitors Sterling Achievement Award
Robert Tatara Poland's Millennium on U.S. and Polish Covers - 1959 to 1967
American Philatelic Congress-Best Polish Exhibit
Slawomir Chabros Correspondence of Polish Legions 1914-1917
United States Stamp Society Medal
James Allen The First United States 12c Stamp 1851-1861
United States Philatelic Classics Society Medal
Robert D. Hohertz Revenue Stamped Paper of the Spanish American War Tax Era
United States Cancellations Club Award
Lisa Foster American Postal Machine Company Chicago, ILL. Main Post Office Letter
Die Flag Cancels
Postal History Society Medal
Wieslaw Kostka Kingdom of Poland - Study of Rates for Stampless Mail 1815-1871
Military Postal History Society Award
Slawomir Chabros Correspondence of Polish Legions 1914-1917
American Topical Association Medal
Ryszard Prange Basketball Report - I Love This Game
American Philatelic Congress Award
Jack R. Congrove Alexander Hamilton: Soldier, Financier, Statesman, Founder
American First Day Cover Society Award
Robert Tatara Poland's Millennium on U.S. and Polish Covers - 1959 to 1967
American Association of Philatelic Exhibitors Award of Excellence-Plans and Headings
Gregory Shoults Washington and Franklin Coils 1908-1924 Flat Plate, Rotary Press and
Coil Waste Issues
American Association of Philatelic Exhibitors Creativity Award
Kathryn L. Johnson Senegal: French Colonial Africa 1914-1940
American Association of Philatelic Exhibitors Award of Honor
Milosz Rzadkosz Military Postal Censorship in 1939 in Poland
American Association of Philatelic Exhibitors Award of Honor
Dickson Preston Canal Zone Postal Rates 1928-1958
American Airmail Society Award
Jerzy Kupiec-Weglinski Air Mail in the Polish Territories (1914-1939)
NON-COMPETITIVE EXHIBITS
Chicagoland Chapter #5, German Philatelic Society
Glen Ellyn Philatelic Club
Park Forest Stamp Club
Ukranian Philatelic-Numismatic Society, Chicago Chapter
Illinois Postal History Society
CHICAGOPEX 2014 Jury Members:
Stephen Reinhard, Jury Chairman Mineola, NY
Bill Schultz, Judge West Chester, PA
Dr. Peter McCann, Judge Winter Park, FL
Dr. James Mazepa, Judge Sarasota, FL
Jacek Kosmala, Judge Poland
Dr. Edwin Andrews, Judge Chapel Hill, NC

Posted Nov 22, 14 21:16 by Leonard Piszkiewicz (lenp99)

Valid US postage... ---not

The letter was mailed at a post office other than a US office (i.e., at a foreign office). The New York marking indicates an incoming foreign letter.

Posted Nov 22, 14 20:07 by Ray Porter (rporter314)

Valid US postage stamps rejected as postage

I believe this double weight letter was sent from Conastota NY, was processed in NYC, and sent on to Petersborough NY. It had two regular issue stamps indicating double weight both cancelled with stars. The clerk considered the stamps as invalid and marked UPU style. The clerk then rated the letter as a double weight UPU letter and applied the penalty for a total due of 20 cents.

The question is, why would the clerk consider this a UPU letter and not a ship letter, or is there some other possibility?

Image

Posted Nov 22, 14 17:56 by Andrew Reid (andrewukusa1847)

1868 3d Rate Circular GB-USA

I have not come across a 3d (6c) circular rate from Great Britain to the United States before, until this example. The sender is one of the relatively well known sources of circulars to the United States, so they are not unfamiliar with postal rates. Does anybody (Ron?) know why this would have been sent at 3d (Single rate for a letter of under 1/2 ounce was 6d, so this is definitely a concessionary rate of some sort, and the interior does have "Registered At The General Post Office for Transmission Abroad" which would be expected in this type of mail. It was unsealed, and has no writing, as per regs.

Image

Posted Nov 22, 14 17:49 by Andrew Reid (andrewukusa1847)

1850 Maine to San Francisco Forwarded to Astoria, Oregon Territory

Came across the attached cover sent from Bowdoinham, Maine on August 23, 1850 to an individual on board the Brig "Fawn" in San Francisco at the 40 Cents rate that was then forwarded for an additional 12 1/2 Cents to Astoria, Oregon Territory. I have found a few references to the "Fawn" in military reports and also reference to its wreck in 1856 on the Oregon Coast.

My thanks to Rick Mingee for noting via RetroReveal that there are both a San Francisco integrated 40 rate CDS and a red '12 1/2' in the same shade that are light and very hard to spot (CDS to right on Maine CDS and rate mark below the m/s 40).

Image

Posted Nov 22, 14 11:28 by Ken Lawrence (kenlawrence)

MOM

Curt,

I think Joseph Schermack and his successors experimented with several styles of punch to see which would best engage the sprocket at high speed. The early styles were small and primitive.

The Type III slot evidently worked best, or at least provided the best patent protection, but he/they probably had tools left over that worked but were not as desirable.

The rule that postage had to be bought at the post office where mailed meant opening a perforator operation in each town where customers bought or rented Mailometers. Why not use a less worthy or obsolete tool in a town that had few users, rather than build a new one?

[For those who are new to this discussion, Schermack/Mailometer perforations were not used to assist separation. The mailing machines separated each stamp with a knife cut as it was affixed to the envelope.]

Posted Nov 22, 14 10:08 by Curt McCoy (curt mccoy)

MOM type V

Ken

I see what you are saying and that makes sense.  I have no in depth knowledge of the subject, only questions.

But I'm curious, as to your opinion, why you think they opted to use Mailometer type I and type IV in St. Louis.  If it's the same or similar machine with just a perforator bar, I'd have thought they would have continued with a Schermack type III bar. They must of had some inventory of them on hand to support their other offices.

Posted Nov 21, 14 15:50 by Ken Lawrence (kenlawrence)

Post Office is the most-loved government service


link here

Posted Nov 21, 14 10:48 by Ken Lawrence (kenlawrence)

MOM type V

I doubt these were separate machines. It's more likely they were separate perforator bars for one or two machines, in which case they might have been inserted only briefly, possibly for only one run. (These were stroke perforators, with the punch going up and down rapidly as the wide roll advanced one position at a time.)
 
One run comprised 20 3,000-stamp coils, but if these were mostly samples for the POD/BEP to consider, any that were sold to MOM customers were remainders.

Philatelic business was good enough to justify constructing a second MOM perforator bar to fill Charles Mekeel's late order, but could not have competed with genuine customers who bought or rented MOM mailing machines.

Posted Nov 21, 14 9:49 by Curt McCoy (curt mccoy)

MOM type V

I agree with the premise that it was temporary solution to keep the supply chain full. Probably caused by a break down with the Schermack type III perforator.  Of the four companies that are known on cover, all reverted back to Schermack type IIIs soon afterward.

Now as I'm typing this I realize that their normal process perforated and coiled 60,000 stamps at a time. Where are they all ?

Why didn't they used the type II or type III perforators also known to be in Detroit ?

My best guess is, they were already using those to make request items for stamp dealers and collectors. Presumably at a nice premium, they didn't want to jepordize that business. Without fanfare, they pulled an previously unknown perforator out of mothballs.

Posted Nov 21, 14 9:09 by Ken Lawrence (kenlawrence)

MOM Type V

That must have been a utility perforator bar, possibly a temporary substitute while slot punches were being sharpened or replaced on the Schermack Type III perforator bar. I think the tool itself was manufactured to demonstrate to the POD and the Bureau a perforation style that would be acceptable in the event the government wanted to supply coils suitable for use in Mailometer machines. 

If it was not a temporary substitute, another possibility is that the known examples on cover were simply remainders from a test or demonstration of that style. I don't believe it was a production standard.

Whatever the case may have been, the combination of a scarce proprietary perforation and a control perfin is a toastworthy discovery. Salud!

Posted Nov 21, 14 9:00 by Ken Lawrence (kenlawrence)

Gauge 12 flat-plate coils

Manually assembled coils were stripped first into 20-subject ribbons, then pasted end to end, so misalignment, mismatched widths, and scissor-trimmed edges at the paste-ups are not rare. Auto-Wound coils were pasted first, then stripped, so the joins match and the edges are parallel except, as Clark wrote, on the outer rows of the original Stickney coiler knife setting.

Very few gauge 12 coils were Auto-Wound, because the perforation rows were so weak that they tended to separate and jam the coiler as they were being slit. Mick Hadley had a 2¢ perf 12 horizontal format coil end with leader strip marked Auto-Wound, but nearly all 1910 and 1911 Auto-Wound coils, both horizontal and vertical, are either imperforate or gauge 8½ — the coarse gauge that eliminated the separation problem on the coiler but proved difficult for users to separate. Eventually the BEP settled on gauge 10 as strong enough to endure the coiler tension but easily enough separated to satisfy customers.

Posted Nov 21, 14 5:27 by Curt McCoy (curt mccoy)

Discovery Cover

According to Steven Belasco in his book, Guide To United States Vending And Affixing Machine Perforations 1907-1927, only 4 commercial covers are known to exist with Mailometer type V perforations.  All known covers are postmarked from Detroit between 5/20/1911 and 6/02/1911.  If that number is still accurate, we have just found number 5 .

Making that even more exciting, this #384 on cover has control identification marks !

The discovery of a single used #384 stamp having Mailometer type V perforations with control marks was made in 2010 and certified as genuine by the APS later that year.  That one of a kind stamp was recently sold in a Kelleher auction, in March 2014.

The newest discovery has the same control pattern and is found on a Chalmers Motor Company cover dated 5/22/1911.

Image

Posted Nov 21, 14 0:11 by Richard Drews (bear427)

356 paste up

Clark is correct. The 356 is the only coil pasted up in this fashion. I just discussed it with Greg tonight at Chicagopex.

Rich

Posted Nov 20, 14 23:54 by Clark Frazier (cfrphoto)

356 Paste Up

Normal US flat plate paste up were assembled from left to right with the strip of 20 on the right pasted on top of the strip to the left. Paste up on the 10 cent 356 were assembled from right to left leaving the left stamp on top instead of the right. Because no imperforate stock exists, it would be extremely difficult to fake a 356 paste up pair.

Misalignments could be a result of variation in the width of the strips of 20 cut from partially perforated sheets. Misalignment on both sides is less common but apparently not impossible. Occasionally, a projecting corner would be hand trimmed with scissors, affecting maybe 1/3 of the margin for one stamp. (I don't know if anyone has any kind of a census. I have seen a couple in the course of expertizing coils.)

When the Stickney coilers became available, some perf 12 sheets were cut in half and pasted up into rolls 10 wide. The amount of tension required to coil perf 12 half sheets must have been too much because the switch to perf 8½ was almost immediate. Some perf 12 single line Auto Wound coils are known to exist, but I would defer to Ken Lawrence to provide a more complete account.

Another oddity of Auto Wound coil production was that the outside edges of the half sheets were not trimmed in early production runs with the result that some perf 8½ paste up pairs exist with a width change or step on the untrimmed side and a straight cut on the other side.

Clark

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